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Aircraft Discussion

The FAA this week issued a final rule (BasicMed) that allows GA pilots to fly without holding an FAA medical certificate, as long as they meet certain requirements.

Until now, the FAA has required private, recreational, and student pilots, as well as flight instructors, to meet the requirements of and hold a third class medical certificate. They are required to complete an online application and undergo a physical examination with an FAA-designated Aviation Medical Examiner.

FAA New Drone Rules

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
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FAA Launches New Drone Rules

On August 29, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) new comprehensive regulations went into effect for routine, non-recreational use of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) – more popularly known as “drones.” The provisions of the new rule – formally known as part 107 – are designed to minimize risks to other aircraft, and people and property on the ground. A summary is available here. (PDF)

Testing centers nationwide can now administer the Aeronautical Knowledge Test required under part 107. After you pass the test, you must complete an FAA Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application at: https://iacra.faa.gov/IACRA/Default.aspx to receive your remote pilot certificate.

My Garmin Android Pilot

Took a VFR flight recently with my 32GB Nexus 7 (2nd Gen) tablet loaded with Garmin Pilot along with a couple other pilots using their iPads, Foreflight and the Stratus 2. I am always pleased with my android tablet and the built in GPS along with cellular modem for 4G reception. Only one piece of modest priced equipment at $349, as opposed to two with a 32GB iPad mini WiFi at $459 + the Stratus 2 at $899. The iPad mini with cellular modem and GPS is about $599. If you wish the addition of active weather and traffic for your android, the Garmin GDL 39 sells for $899 like the Stratus. I know it’s not always about money when you are a GA flyer, but then I’m a bit of an Android fan. Okay, yes, I know the iPad/Stratus 2/Foreflight combo has ADS-B traffic plus WAAS GPS and my single android setup doesn’t, but for VFR, the Garmin Pilot+Android tablet has become quite capable for what I needed on the flight.

Skycatcher
End of LSA? Been thinking about the Cessna Skycatcher LSA (162) aircraft ending production and some saying the LSA movement is over. Well, probably not. Especially not simply because Cessna decided to be out of that market. There are scores of active LSA manufacturers that have aircraft flying in many parts of the world including the US and many of those are at FBO’s for training. It did seem as though everyone was expecting the 162 to be the next 152. However, the lower purchase costs and rental rates of the 152 vs 162, has kept the 152 a very popular trainer. The greater useful load for the 152 is also a positive factor. People don’t seem to be getting smaller these days.

GA Protection Act

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: 1

General Aviation Protection Act (GAPPA)

You have probably heard of the two pieces of legislation currently going through the US Congress and Senate, which includes a provision that would reform airman medical certificate standards while maintaining safety. The EAA has created a web page that will send a message/petition to your Senators and Representatives urging their support of the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act.

http://govt.eaa.org/14781/support-general-aviation-pilot-protection-act/

Also, please contact your Senators and Representative and politely ask them to co-sponsor the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act. A phone call generally creates the fastest results.

http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm?OrderBy=state

A possible email…

FAA Action

Final Notice Of The Process For Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed Via Asdi.

**Read Full FAA Rule Release...Tracking

…Conclusions

With respect to the procedures for aircraft owner and operator requests to block and unblock aircraft from inclusion in the FAA’s ASDI data feed, the FAA concludes as follows:

1. Requestors. The FAA will honor each written request of an aircraft owner and operator, submitted in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 3 to block or unblock their aircraft’s appearance in the FAA’s public ASDI data feed. Aircraft owners and operators may submit their request on their own behalf, or they may do so through a legally authorized agent, including an attorney or an aircraft management company with a fiduciary duty to carry out the owner’s or operator’s express wishes with respect to the aircraft.

FCC and 121.5 ELT

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
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FCC again trying to ban the 121.5 Mhz ELTs…

Here is an excerpt of the proposed rule:

ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz will no longer be certified. The manufacture, importation, and sale of ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz is prohibited beginning [ONE YEAR AFTER EFFECTIVE DATE]. Existing ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz must be operated as certified.

Link to the complete FCC Proposed Rule

The FCC is requesting comment on whether the manufacturers, importers, sellers, and, in particular, users of 121.5 MHz ELTs are small entities, and the extent to which a total or partial prohibition of 121.5 MHz ELTs might impose burdens on them. It is estimated that there are 200,000 aircraft currently equipped with the 121.5 MHz units and replacement for owners would approach $300 million dollars.

Ready to Buy an Airplane?
Over the years I have bought a few airplanes and here are some thoughts and information that should be helpful for those who have not had the experience yet.

What Do I Want and How Much?
Assuming you already have some type of aircraft in mind, you should begin your research by going to the main for-sale sites. Barnstormers, Trade-a-Plane and the Controller would be good sites to start with. Look carefully at the listings for the type you are interested in and pay close attention to not only the features listed but the implications of things that are not mentioned.

Was thinking about my early training days and reflected on the airplane I was trained in. Actually several, but all were low wing Pipers. In my many years of flying, I had been in clubs with both high/low wing and have owned both. Some of my favorite airplanes are high wing like the Cessna Cardinal, the 210 Centurion or the fun little Citabria, but then I also liked the Piper Archer, Lance and the A36 Bonanza. Even still, there is still a special place that has a preference for the low wing, the type that I was originally trained in. I would suppose that most pilots have that innate preference for their first flying experiences including the high/low wing preference. So are there any significant differences other than simply preference. Well, let’s make a list:

Flying Cars

Categories: Aircraft
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Terrifugia

 

Found some fun Flying Car photos and history.

Check out the Gallery….

 

 

Why a flying car might be difficult to create:

Made for Driving Made for Flying
 auto  plane
Auto engines are designed
to have varying rpm for
constant speed changes in
traffic.
 Airplane engines run at a near
constant rpm at @1/2 an auto’s
maximum.
 Auto wheels are on the
outer perimeter & away from CG
to provide stability.
 Landing gear is near the CG for
easier rotation during takeoff &
landing.

Selling An Airplane

Categories: Aircraft
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Recently I put up an airplane for sale and although I have sold three planes before, each time seems to be a different experience. So here is what went on and what one needs to think about.

How Much?
Currently aircraft are not selling all that well, so prices are depressed. The first thing I did was go to the AOPA website and do a VREF (Aircraft Value Reference) to see what the plane is estimated to be worth. You need to be an AOPA member to use the VREF, but being an AOPA member is definitely worthwhile for pilots with all the membership benefits. Well, a bit of a surprise on the value, but then everyone always thinks their stuff is worth more than the market. I also looked at the various for-sale sites to see what the asking prices were. I chose a price a bit higher so I had room to negotiate.

 

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