The General Aviation Pilots Flying Resource

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BasicMed has allowed thousands of pilots to skip seeing an aviation medical ­examiner (AME) and instead visit their personal physician for a checkup ­every four years. Plus take a free online aeromedical factors course every two years. If you’re over 40, this doubles the time interval between seeing an AME physician every two years. It should be less costly because personal medical insurance generally covers physicals but not necessarily third-class FAA exams.

BasicMed Renewal Requirements

FAA BasicMed News

Categories: Medical, Newsworthy
Comments: No

FAA BasicMed News As of 04-24-17

Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist has been released!  (BasicMedChecklist)

It still appears to some, that finding a non-AME physician that will sign the checklist may be difficult due to the liabilities potentially involved. The non-AME physician must certify, that there is no medical condition, that as presently treated, could interfere with the individuals ability to safely operate an aircraft.

To keep up with the FAA progress on BasicMed, it appears that this page url will have the latest news and info. https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/basic_med/

Here’s what the FAA says today:

Here is a link to the  FAA Advisory_Circular/AC_68-1.pdf  that contains:

The SUMMARY OF BASICMED REQUIREMENTS and COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL EXAMINATION CHECKLIST (Draft)

As of today, I do not see any final checklist that is downloadable.

What Do I Need to Fly Under BasicMed? 1. Hold a U.S. driver’s license. 2. Hold or have held a medical certificate issued by the FAA at any point after July 15, 2006. 3. Answer the health questions on the Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist (CMEC). 4. Get your physical examination by any state-licensed physician, and have that physician complete the CMEC (be sure to keep the CMEC). 5. Take the online medical education course and complete the attestations/consent to the National Driver Register (NDR) check. Keep the course completion document.

The FAA this week issued a final rule (BasicMed) that allows GA pilots to fly without holding an FAA medical certificate, as long as they meet certain requirements.

Until now, the FAA has required private, recreational, and student pilots, as well as flight instructors, to meet the requirements of and hold a third class medical certificate. They are required to complete an online application and undergo a physical examination with an FAA-designated Aviation Medical Examiner.

FAA New Drone Rules

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: No

FAA Launches New Drone Rules

On August 29, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) new comprehensive regulations went into effect for routine, non-recreational use of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) – more popularly known as “drones.” The provisions of the new rule – formally known as part 107 – are designed to minimize risks to other aircraft, and people and property on the ground. A summary is available here. (PDF)

Testing centers nationwide can now administer the Aeronautical Knowledge Test required under part 107. After you pass the test, you must complete an FAA Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application at: https://iacra.faa.gov/IACRA/Default.aspx to receive your remote pilot certificate.

Hobby or recreational…
…flying doesn’t require FAA approval but you must follow safety guidelines. Any other use requires FAA FAA Model Card
authorization. Avoid doing anything hazardous to other airplanes or people and property on the ground.

Model Aircraft/Hobby Drones Operations Limits
According to the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 as (1) the aircraft is flown strictly for hobby or recreational use; (2) the aircraft is operated in accordance with a community-based set of safety guidelines and within the programming of a nationwide community-based organization; (3) the aircraft is limited to not more than 55 pounds unless otherwise certified through a design, construction, inspection, flight test, and operational safety program administered by a community-based organization; (4) the aircraft is operated in a manner that does not interfere with and gives way to any manned aircraft; (5) when flown within 5 miles of an airport, the operator of the aircraft provides the airport operator and the airport air traffic control tower with prior notice of the operation; and (6) the aircraft is flown within visual line sight of the operator.

 Aviation Weather Center Media Release…New Aviation Weather Site

Technical Implementation Notice 14-07
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC

750 AM EST Mon Feb 3 2014

TO: Subscribers: Family of Services
-NOAA Weather Wire Service
-Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
-NOAAPort
Other NWS Partners and Employees

FROM:      Cyndie Abelman
Chief, Aviation Services Branch

SUBJECT:   www.AviationWeather.gov Design Refresh

Effective Tuesday, March 25, 2014, at 1800 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the NWS Aviation Weather Center will implement newly designed webpages to the www.aviationweather.gov and
www.aviationweather.gov/adds These design improvements will affect the look and feel of the website, but will not change the content. Users can examine the changes before March 25, 2014 at new.aviationweather.gov/ and new.aviationweather.gov/adds

GA Protection Act

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: 1

General Aviation Protection Act (GAPPA)

You have probably heard of the two pieces of legislation currently going through the US Congress and Senate, which includes a provision that would reform airman medical certificate standards while maintaining safety. The EAA has created a web page that will send a message/petition to your Senators and Representatives urging their support of the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act.

http://govt.eaa.org/14781/support-general-aviation-pilot-protection-act/

Also, please contact your Senators and Representative and politely ask them to co-sponsor the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act. A phone call generally creates the fastest results.

http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm?OrderBy=state

A possible email…

LANDING AT WRONG AIRPORT

Most of the aviation world has seen/heard the story of the Boeing 747 Dreamlifter that landed at the wrong Wichita-area airport a bit ago. Is it really that unusual? Probably unusual yes for 747’s, but one has to wonder if it doesn’t happen occasionally to smaller GA aircraft. I recall several years ago and incident here in Minneapolis that created a similar stir. Not so much with the general public, but with the local aviation community.

iOS 7 Update Caution

Categories: Apps, Newsworthy
Comments: No

WingX Pro/ Hilton Software iOS 7 Update Caution…iOS 7

…. because of issues we have seen with iOS 7 (reboots, lock up, and strange UI behavior) and unrelated to any third party app (including WingX Pro7), we cannot recommend upgrading your iPhone or iPad to iOS 7 (for now).
If you have already upgraded to iOS 7.0, just be aware that there are some instability issues in the underlying iOS and be sure to upgrade to the latest iOS as soon as Apple releases an update. Read Full Article!

FAA Action

Final Notice Of The Process For Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed Via Asdi.

**Read Full FAA Rule Release...Tracking

…Conclusions

With respect to the procedures for aircraft owner and operator requests to block and unblock aircraft from inclusion in the FAA’s ASDI data feed, the FAA concludes as follows:

1. Requestors. The FAA will honor each written request of an aircraft owner and operator, submitted in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 3 to block or unblock their aircraft’s appearance in the FAA’s public ASDI data feed. Aircraft owners and operators may submit their request on their own behalf, or they may do so through a legally authorized agent, including an attorney or an aircraft management company with a fiduciary duty to carry out the owner’s or operator’s express wishes with respect to the aircraft.

EAA, AOPA Urge Survey Participation for Medical Exemption
 (from http://eaa.org/govt/)
3rd Class
EAA and AOPA continue their joint efforts to have the FAA grant a third-class medical exemption for private pilots who fly noncomplex aircraft, and you can help.

The petition was submitted in March 2012, and the two organizations recently received indications that the FAA sought more data related to the rate of medically related incidents among pilots flying under sport pilot rules. This data will help the FAA decide whether to allow private pilots or better to fly day VFR, four-seat (with one passenger), 180-hp-maximum aircraft using a self-certification medical standard and a driver’s license in lieu of a traditional third-class FAA medical.

NTSB The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released its accident statistics for 2012 and it shows little progress in the General Aviation sector. Sad to note that in most fatal GA accidents, all aboard perish.

GAAccidents ______ Fatalaties ________ Flt HrsAccidents/100,000 FltHrs
YearAllFatalTotalAboardTotalAllFatal
20121,47127143243221,697,0006.781.24
20111,47026644843721,488,0006.841.24
20101,44027045745421,688,0006.631.24

FCC and 121.5 ELT

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: No

FCC again trying to ban the 121.5 Mhz ELTs…

Here is an excerpt of the proposed rule:

ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz will no longer be certified. The manufacture, importation, and sale of ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz is prohibited beginning [ONE YEAR AFTER EFFECTIVE DATE]. Existing ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz must be operated as certified.

Link to the complete FCC Proposed Rule

The FCC is requesting comment on whether the manufacturers, importers, sellers, and, in particular, users of 121.5 MHz ELTs are small entities, and the extent to which a total or partial prohibition of 121.5 MHz ELTs might impose burdens on them. It is estimated that there are 200,000 aircraft currently equipped with the 121.5 MHz units and replacement for owners would approach $300 million dollars.

A Dangerous Turn to Downwind?

Recently there has been a bit of conversation in the aviation community about a NTSB Report wherein the NTSB states, the airplane a progressively increasing downwind condition during the turn as a probable cause of the accident.

Here is the report:
 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 28, 2012 in Perry, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2012
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN T-6G, registration: N3753G
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Adverse Condition AlertingFS

The new alert service from Lockheed Martin Flight Services proactively notifies a pilot when a new adverse condition that affects a flight plan arises after the flight plan was briefed or simply filed. The ACAS was created because pilots may be unaware of new adverse conditions that arise between telephone interactions or radio contacts with Flight Services, in some cases resulting in a safety issue for the pilot. The alert messages are short. They identify the type of adverse condition and the flight plan to which it applies. Initially, the alerts will be sent to the pilot using (SMS) text messaging.

The ACAS generates flight plan-specific alerts for:

 

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