The General Aviation Pilots Flying Resource

All posts in Training

Always Something New

My Garmin Android Pilot

Took a VFR flight recently with my 32GB Nexus 7 (2nd Gen) tablet loaded with Garmin Pilot along with a couple other pilots using their iPads, Foreflight and the Stratus 2. I am always pleased with my android tablet and the built in GPS along with cellular modem for 4G reception. Only one piece of modest priced equipment at $349, as opposed to two with a 32GB iPad mini WiFi at $459 + the Stratus 2 at $899. The iPad mini with cellular modem and GPS is about $599. If you wish the addition of active weather and traffic for your android, the Garmin GDL 39 sells for $899 like the Stratus. I know it’s not always about money when you are a GA flyer, but then I’m a bit of an Android fan. Okay, yes, I know the iPad/Stratus 2/Foreflight combo has ADS-B traffic plus WAAS GPS and my single android setup doesn’t, but for VFR, the Garmin Pilot+Android tablet has become quite capable for what I needed on the flight.

Skycatcher
End of LSA? Been thinking about the Cessna Skycatcher LSA (162) aircraft ending production and some saying the LSA movement is over. Well, probably not. Especially not simply because Cessna decided to be out of that market. There are scores of active LSA manufacturers that have aircraft flying in many parts of the world including the US and many of those are at FBO’s for training. It did seem as though everyone was expecting the 162 to be the next 152. However, the lower purchase costs and rental rates of the 152 vs 162, has kept the 152 a very popular trainer. The greater useful load for the 152 is also a positive factor. People don’t seem to be getting smaller these days.

 Aviation Weather Center Media Release…New Aviation Weather Site

Technical Implementation Notice 14-07
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC

750 AM EST Mon Feb 3 2014

TO: Subscribers: Family of Services
-NOAA Weather Wire Service
-Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
-NOAAPort
Other NWS Partners and Employees

FROM:      Cyndie Abelman
Chief, Aviation Services Branch

SUBJECT:   www.AviationWeather.gov Design Refresh

Effective Tuesday, March 25, 2014, at 1800 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the NWS Aviation Weather Center will implement newly designed webpages to the www.aviationweather.gov and
www.aviationweather.gov/adds These design improvements will affect the look and feel of the website, but will not change the content. Users can examine the changes before March 25, 2014 at new.aviationweather.gov/ and new.aviationweather.gov/adds

LANDING AT WRONG AIRPORT

Most of the aviation world has seen/heard the story of the Boeing 747 Dreamlifter that landed at the wrong Wichita-area airport a bit ago. Is it really that unusual? Probably unusual yes for 747’s, but one has to wonder if it doesn’t happen occasionally to smaller GA aircraft. I recall several years ago and incident here in Minneapolis that created a similar stir. Not so much with the general public, but with the local aviation community.

NTSB The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released its accident statistics for 2012 and it shows little progress in the General Aviation sector. Sad to note that in most fatal GA accidents, all aboard perish.

GAAccidents ______ Fatalaties ________ Flt HrsAccidents/100,000 FltHrs
YearAllFatalTotalAboardTotalAllFatal
20121,47127143243221,697,0006.781.24
20111,47026644843721,488,0006.841.24
20101,44027045745421,688,0006.631.24

Class Ground & Class Everywhere else Airspace

For some reason, Class E and the underlying Class G seem to be challenging for a lot of students to wrap their head around. Basically Class E is everything that is not A, B, C, D or G. I know, a pretty obvious statement. I believe one of the problems in understanding is diagrams that squeeze all the different airspaces into one small place like the one here.

Airspace

Night, Decoding FARS

Categories: Training
Comments: No

Night Flying and Decoding the FAR’s

Let’s take a look at the varied regulations on what is considered night, civil twilight, sunset, sunrise and the different certificate limitations. Probably should start with the FAA’s definition of night.

Far Part 1.1   General definitions.
Night means the time between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight, as published in the Air Almanac, converted to local time.

A Dangerous Turn to Downwind?

Recently there has been a bit of conversation in the aviation community about a NTSB Report wherein the NTSB states, the airplane a progressively increasing downwind condition during the turn as a probable cause of the accident.

Here is the report:
 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 28, 2012 in Perry, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2012
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN T-6G, registration: N3753G
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Air Density & Humidity

I can remember the early days of my flight instruction and the written test materials all talking about the 3 H’s, Hot, High & Humid, relating to air density. We all know that as air heats up it expands and becomes less dense. Sort of the can’t catch my breath feeling on the really hot days. We also have been told and learned that as we climb in our airplanes gaining altitude, the air also becomes less dense and the carbureted engine needs to be leaned to accommodate. Makes sense. If you stand atop Pikes Peak at 14,110ft, the air is pretty thin and people will even develop altitude sickness.

Was thinking about my early training days and reflected on the airplane I was trained in. Actually several, but all were low wing Pipers. In my many years of flying, I had been in clubs with both high/low wing and have owned both. Some of my favorite airplanes are high wing like the Cessna Cardinal, the 210 Centurion or the fun little Citabria, but then I also liked the Piper Archer, Lance and the A36 Bonanza. Even still, there is still a special place that has a preference for the low wing, the type that I was originally trained in. I would suppose that most pilots have that innate preference for their first flying experiences including the high/low wing preference. So are there any significant differences other than simply preference. Well, let’s make a list:

 

Fatal error: Out of memory (allocated 483655680) (tried to allocate 130968 bytes) in /homepages/27/d423526145/htdocs/myflyingstuff/wp-includes/class.wp-dependencies.php on line 330