The General Aviation Pilots Flying Resource

MyFlyingStuff BLOG

BasicMed has allowed thousands of pilots to skip seeing an aviation medical ­examiner (AME) and instead visit their personal physician for a checkup ­every four years. Plus take a free online aeromedical factors course every two years. If you’re over 40, this doubles the time interval between seeing an AME physician every two years. It should be less costly because personal medical insurance generally covers physicals but not necessarily third-class FAA exams.

BasicMed Renewal Requirements

FAA BasicMed News

Categories: Medical, Newsworthy
Comments: No

FAA BasicMed News As of 04-24-17

Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist has been released!  (BasicMedChecklist)

It still appears to some, that finding a non-AME physician that will sign the checklist may be difficult due to the liabilities potentially involved. The non-AME physician must certify, that there is no medical condition, that as presently treated, could interfere with the individuals ability to safely operate an aircraft.

To keep up with the FAA progress on BasicMed, it appears that this page url will have the latest news and info. https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/basic_med/

Here’s what the FAA says today:

Here is a link to the  FAA Advisory_Circular/AC_68-1.pdf  that contains:

The SUMMARY OF BASICMED REQUIREMENTS and COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL EXAMINATION CHECKLIST (Draft)

As of today, I do not see any final checklist that is downloadable.

What Do I Need to Fly Under BasicMed? 1. Hold a U.S. driver’s license. 2. Hold or have held a medical certificate issued by the FAA at any point after July 15, 2006. 3. Answer the health questions on the Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist (CMEC). 4. Get your physical examination by any state-licensed physician, and have that physician complete the CMEC (be sure to keep the CMEC). 5. Take the online medical education course and complete the attestations/consent to the National Driver Register (NDR) check. Keep the course completion document.

The FAA this week issued a final rule (BasicMed) that allows GA pilots to fly without holding an FAA medical certificate, as long as they meet certain requirements.

Until now, the FAA has required private, recreational, and student pilots, as well as flight instructors, to meet the requirements of and hold a third class medical certificate. They are required to complete an online application and undergo a physical examination with an FAA-designated Aviation Medical Examiner.

FAA New Drone Rules

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: No

FAA Launches New Drone Rules

On August 29, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) new comprehensive regulations went into effect for routine, non-recreational use of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) – more popularly known as “drones.” The provisions of the new rule – formally known as part 107 – are designed to minimize risks to other aircraft, and people and property on the ground. A summary is available here. (PDF)

Testing centers nationwide can now administer the Aeronautical Knowledge Test required under part 107. After you pass the test, you must complete an FAA Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application at: https://iacra.faa.gov/IACRA/Default.aspx to receive your remote pilot certificate.

Hobby or recreational…
…flying doesn’t require FAA approval but you must follow safety guidelines. Any other use requires FAA FAA Model Card
authorization. Avoid doing anything hazardous to other airplanes or people and property on the ground.

Model Aircraft/Hobby Drones Operations Limits
According to the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 as (1) the aircraft is flown strictly for hobby or recreational use; (2) the aircraft is operated in accordance with a community-based set of safety guidelines and within the programming of a nationwide community-based organization; (3) the aircraft is limited to not more than 55 pounds unless otherwise certified through a design, construction, inspection, flight test, and operational safety program administered by a community-based organization; (4) the aircraft is operated in a manner that does not interfere with and gives way to any manned aircraft; (5) when flown within 5 miles of an airport, the operator of the aircraft provides the airport operator and the airport air traffic control tower with prior notice of the operation; and (6) the aircraft is flown within visual line sight of the operator.

My Garmin Android Pilot

Took a VFR flight recently with my 32GB Nexus 7 (2nd Gen) tablet loaded with Garmin Pilot along with a couple other pilots using their iPads, Foreflight and the Stratus 2. I am always pleased with my android tablet and the built in GPS along with cellular modem for 4G reception. Only one piece of modest priced equipment at $349, as opposed to two with a 32GB iPad mini WiFi at $459 + the Stratus 2 at $899. The iPad mini with cellular modem and GPS is about $599. If you wish the addition of active weather and traffic for your android, the Garmin GDL 39 sells for $899 like the Stratus. I know it’s not always about money when you are a GA flyer, but then I’m a bit of an Android fan. Okay, yes, I know the iPad/Stratus 2/Foreflight combo has ADS-B traffic plus WAAS GPS and my single android setup doesn’t, but for VFR, the Garmin Pilot+Android tablet has become quite capable for what I needed on the flight.

Aviation Humor

Categories: Humor
Comments: No

Beginner’s Guide to Aviation Terminology… 

( Found in one of those forwarded emails )
AIRSPEED – Speed of an airplane. (Deduct at least 25% when listening to a fighter pilot. Deduct 50% when listening to a Mooney pilot)
BANK – An institution that holds the lien on most pilots’ cars.
CARBURETOR ICING – A phenomenon reported to the FAA by pilots immediately after they run out of gas.
CONE OF CONFUSION – An area about the size of New Jersey located near the final approach fix at an airport.
DEAD RECKONING – You reckon correctly, or you are.
DESTINATION – Geographical location 15 minutes beyond the pilot’s bladder saturation point.
ENGINE FAILURE – A condition that always results when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with low-octane air.
FIREWALL – Section of the aircraft specifically designed to funnel heat and smoke into the cockpit.
FLIGHT FOLLOWING – 1. Formation flying 2. Bird watching.
GLIDE DISTANCE – Half the distance from an airplane to the nearest emergency landing field.
HOBBS METER – An instrument requiring an immediate emergency landing if it should fail during dual instruction.
HYDROPLANE – An airplane landing long and “hot” on a short and very wet runway.
LEAN MIXTURE – Nonalcoholic beer.
MINI MAG LITE – Device designed to support the AAA battery industry.
NANOSECOND – Time delay between the Low Fuel Warning light and the onset of carburetor icing (see above).
PARASITIC DRAG – A pilot who bums a ride and complains about the service.
RICH MIXTURE – What you order at another pilot’s promotion party.
ROGER – Used when you have no idea about what else to say.
SECTIONAL CHART – Any chart that ends 25 nm short of your destination.
SERVICE CEILING – Altitude above which the cabin crew cannot serve drinks.
SPOILERS – 1. FAA Inspectors. 2. Box lunches
STALL – Technique used to explain to the bank why your car payment is late.
STEEP BANKS – Banks that charge pilots more than 10% interest.
TURN & BANK INDICATOR – An instrument largely ignored by pilots.
USEFUL LOAD – Volumetric capacity of the aircraft, disregarding weight.
WAC CHART – Directions to the Army female barracks.
YANKEE – Any pilot who has to ask New Orleans tower to “Say again”.

Skycatcher
End of LSA? Been thinking about the Cessna Skycatcher LSA (162) aircraft ending production and some saying the LSA movement is over. Well, probably not. Especially not simply because Cessna decided to be out of that market. There are scores of active LSA manufacturers that have aircraft flying in many parts of the world including the US and many of those are at FBO’s for training. It did seem as though everyone was expecting the 162 to be the next 152. However, the lower purchase costs and rental rates of the 152 vs 162, has kept the 152 a very popular trainer. The greater useful load for the 152 is also a positive factor. People don’t seem to be getting smaller these days.

 Aviation Weather Center Media Release…New Aviation Weather Site

Technical Implementation Notice 14-07
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC

750 AM EST Mon Feb 3 2014

TO: Subscribers: Family of Services
-NOAA Weather Wire Service
-Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
-NOAAPort
Other NWS Partners and Employees

FROM:      Cyndie Abelman
Chief, Aviation Services Branch

SUBJECT:   www.AviationWeather.gov Design Refresh

Effective Tuesday, March 25, 2014, at 1800 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the NWS Aviation Weather Center will implement newly designed webpages to the www.aviationweather.gov and
www.aviationweather.gov/adds These design improvements will affect the look and feel of the website, but will not change the content. Users can examine the changes before March 25, 2014 at new.aviationweather.gov/ and new.aviationweather.gov/adds

GA Protection Act

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: 1

General Aviation Protection Act (GAPPA)

You have probably heard of the two pieces of legislation currently going through the US Congress and Senate, which includes a provision that would reform airman medical certificate standards while maintaining safety. The EAA has created a web page that will send a message/petition to your Senators and Representatives urging their support of the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act.

http://govt.eaa.org/14781/support-general-aviation-pilot-protection-act/

Also, please contact your Senators and Representative and politely ask them to co-sponsor the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act. A phone call generally creates the fastest results.

http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm?OrderBy=state

A possible email…

LANDING AT WRONG AIRPORT

Most of the aviation world has seen/heard the story of the Boeing 747 Dreamlifter that landed at the wrong Wichita-area airport a bit ago. Is it really that unusual? Probably unusual yes for 747’s, but one has to wonder if it doesn’t happen occasionally to smaller GA aircraft. I recall several years ago and incident here in Minneapolis that created a similar stir. Not so much with the general public, but with the local aviation community.

iOS 7 Update Caution

Categories: Apps, Newsworthy
Comments: No

WingX Pro/ Hilton Software iOS 7 Update Caution…iOS 7

…. because of issues we have seen with iOS 7 (reboots, lock up, and strange UI behavior) and unrelated to any third party app (including WingX Pro7), we cannot recommend upgrading your iPhone or iPad to iOS 7 (for now).
If you have already upgraded to iOS 7.0, just be aware that there are some instability issues in the underlying iOS and be sure to upgrade to the latest iOS as soon as Apple releases an update. Read Full Article!

FAA Action

Final Notice Of The Process For Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed Via Asdi.

**Read Full FAA Rule Release...Tracking

…Conclusions

With respect to the procedures for aircraft owner and operator requests to block and unblock aircraft from inclusion in the FAA’s ASDI data feed, the FAA concludes as follows:

1. Requestors. The FAA will honor each written request of an aircraft owner and operator, submitted in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 3 to block or unblock their aircraft’s appearance in the FAA’s public ASDI data feed. Aircraft owners and operators may submit their request on their own behalf, or they may do so through a legally authorized agent, including an attorney or an aircraft management company with a fiduciary duty to carry out the owner’s or operator’s express wishes with respect to the aircraft.

EAA, AOPA Urge Survey Participation for Medical Exemption
 (from http://eaa.org/govt/)
3rd Class
EAA and AOPA continue their joint efforts to have the FAA grant a third-class medical exemption for private pilots who fly noncomplex aircraft, and you can help.

The petition was submitted in March 2012, and the two organizations recently received indications that the FAA sought more data related to the rate of medically related incidents among pilots flying under sport pilot rules. This data will help the FAA decide whether to allow private pilots or better to fly day VFR, four-seat (with one passenger), 180-hp-maximum aircraft using a self-certification medical standard and a driver’s license in lieu of a traditional third-class FAA medical.

NTSB The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released its accident statistics for 2012 and it shows little progress in the General Aviation sector. Sad to note that in most fatal GA accidents, all aboard perish.

GAAccidents ______ Fatalaties ________ Flt HrsAccidents/100,000 FltHrs
YearAllFatalTotalAboardTotalAllFatal
20121,47127143243221,697,0006.781.24
20111,47026644843721,488,0006.841.24
20101,44027045745421,688,0006.631.24

ForeFlight iOS vs Garmin Pilot Android

Background…
Was on a recent flight to Oshkosh for the airshow and I had my trusty Google Nexus7 tablet with the Garmin Pilot app. My friend had his ever faithful iPad with the ForeFlight app. The iPad was WiFi only, so needed an external GPS for moving map and ADS-B device for weather etc. The GPS/ADS-B was the Stratus One. My android tablet was WiFi plus 3/4G cellular and it’s own built-in GPS, so I was able to load up all the latest information during taxi. I believe even WiFi only androids typically have a built in  GPS. Why is this important? The moving map displays require active GPS information. The ADS-B device gave the added traffic information to the iPad which I did not have on my Android tablet.

Class Ground & Class Everywhere else Airspace

For some reason, Class E and the underlying Class G seem to be challenging for a lot of students to wrap their head around. Basically Class E is everything that is not A, B, C, D or G. I know, a pretty obvious statement. I believe one of the problems in understanding is diagrams that squeeze all the different airspaces into one small place like the one here.

Airspace

 

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