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Night, Decoding FARS

Categories: Training
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Night Flying and Decoding the FAR’s

Let’s take a look at the varied regulations on what is considered night, civil twilight, sunset, sunrise and the different certificate limitations. Probably should start with the FAA’s definition of night.

Far Part 1.1   General definitions.
Night means the time between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight, as published in the Air Almanac, converted to local time.

Garmin Pilot Android Review

Everyone talks about the iPad and iPad mini for the aviation apps for navigation and I decided to see what would be comparable on the android platform. I purchased a Nexus 7 tablet and decided that the best app for android to compete with the WingX Pro or Foreflight apps for iPads would be the Garmin Pilot. I have tested and used the WingX for android, but it really is mostly a weather app with some airport charts and a couple aviation functions that is nothing like the maps, etc for the iPad platform. To compare the iPad mini and Nexus 7, here is some basic information:

FCC and 121.5 ELT

Categories: Aircraft, Newsworthy
Comments: No

FCC again trying to ban the 121.5 Mhz ELTs…

Here is an excerpt of the proposed rule:

ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz will no longer be certified. The manufacture, importation, and sale of ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz is prohibited beginning [ONE YEAR AFTER EFFECTIVE DATE]. Existing ELTs that operate only on frequency 121.5 MHz must be operated as certified.

Link to the complete FCC Proposed Rule

The FCC is requesting comment on whether the manufacturers, importers, sellers, and, in particular, users of 121.5 MHz ELTs are small entities, and the extent to which a total or partial prohibition of 121.5 MHz ELTs might impose burdens on them. It is estimated that there are 200,000 aircraft currently equipped with the 121.5 MHz units and replacement for owners would approach $300 million dollars.

A Dangerous Turn to Downwind?

Recently there has been a bit of conversation in the aviation community about a NTSB Report wherein the NTSB states, the airplane a progressively increasing downwind condition during the turn as a probable cause of the accident.

Here is the report:
 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 28, 2012 in Perry, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2012
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN T-6G, registration: N3753G
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Ready to Buy an Airplane?
Over the years I have bought a few airplanes and here are some thoughts and information that should be helpful for those who have not had the experience yet.

What Do I Want and How Much?
Assuming you already have some type of aircraft in mind, you should begin your research by going to the main for-sale sites. Barnstormers, Trade-a-Plane and the Controller would be good sites to start with. Look carefully at the listings for the type you are interested in and pay close attention to not only the features listed but the implications of things that are not mentioned.

Air Density & Humidity

I can remember the early days of my flight instruction and the written test materials all talking about the 3 H’s, Hot, High & Humid, relating to air density. We all know that as air heats up it expands and becomes less dense. Sort of the can’t catch my breath feeling on the really hot days. We also have been told and learned that as we climb in our airplanes gaining altitude, the air also becomes less dense and the carbureted engine needs to be leaned to accommodate. Makes sense. If you stand atop Pikes Peak at 14,110ft, the air is pretty thin and people will even develop altitude sickness.

Why NORAD Tracks Santa Track Santa
For more than 50 years, NORAD and its predecessor, the Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD) have tracked Santa’s flight.

The tradition began in 1955 after a Colorado Springs-based Sears Roebuck & Co. advertisement misprinted the telephone number for children to call Santa.Instead of reaching Santa, the phone number put kids through to the CONAD Commander-in-Chief’s operations “hotline.” The Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way south from the North Pole. Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born. Also track Santa via internet.

Was thinking about my early training days and reflected on the airplane I was trained in. Actually several, but all were low wing Pipers. In my many years of flying, I had been in clubs with both high/low wing and have owned both. Some of my favorite airplanes are high wing like the Cessna Cardinal, the 210 Centurion or the fun little Citabria, but then I also liked the Piper Archer, Lance and the A36 Bonanza. Even still, there is still a special place that has a preference for the low wing, the type that I was originally trained in. I would suppose that most pilots have that innate preference for their first flying experiences including the high/low wing preference. So are there any significant differences other than simply preference. Well, let’s make a list:

New FlyQ

Categories: Apps, New Products
Comments: No

AOPA (Aircraft Owners & Pilots Association)  has just introduced the new FlyQ Pocket for your Apple or Android smartphone. It’s a free app for AOPA members (if you aren’t a member and you fly, you really should look into all their member benefits) and can be downloaded from iTunes or Google Play. I have put it on my Razr Maxx and find that it has a lot of good information when you don’t have your tablet handy. A very nice member benefit.
Some of the key features of FlyQ are:

  • Uses Geo-Location to Display Nearest Airports and Weather FlyQ Pocket
  • AOPA Airports Directory Provides Essential Airport Information at a Glance

Adverse Condition AlertingFS

The new alert service from Lockheed Martin Flight Services proactively notifies a pilot when a new adverse condition that affects a flight plan arises after the flight plan was briefed or simply filed. The ACAS was created because pilots may be unaware of new adverse conditions that arise between telephone interactions or radio contacts with Flight Services, in some cases resulting in a safety issue for the pilot. The alert messages are short. They identify the type of adverse condition and the flight plan to which it applies. Initially, the alerts will be sent to the pilot using (SMS) text messaging.

The ACAS generates flight plan-specific alerts for:

COMPARISON ADS-B

Categories: New Products
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Every time you look at anything flying, you are seeing ads for the ADS-B receivers for your tablets and/or phones.

Just what is all this ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast) stuff anyway?

This is an informational video aimed at providing GA pilots information about the benefits of ADS-B Broadcast Services.

Here is a comparison of some of the main receivers trying to list some of the differences:

GARMIN GDL 39 DUAL XGPS170 CLARITY DUAL STRATUS
NEXRAD radar, METARs, TAFs, PIREPs, TFRs, NOTAMs, SIGMETs, AIRMETs, Winds & Temps Aloft YES YES YES YES
WAAS GPS YES YES YES YES

ADS-B New kid on the Block…

Clarity Ads-B Receivers by Sagetech will begin shipping end of March 2013. These tiny receivers (2.5×2.5×1.24″/5oz) include WAAS GPS, WiFi and Free Inflight NEXRAD Radar, Weather and NOTAM’s etc. (FIS-B) and some ADS-B Out Traffic. Depending on particular unit you can also get full ADS-B Out Traffic and  Synthetic Vision AHRS to enable your 3D Synthetic Vision app. The units are compatible with WingX Pro7, PC Avionics / Mountain Scope, i1000 Flight System, Global Nav Source / iPad EFB, SkyVision Extreme / Xtreme Vision 3D. Sale pricing starting at $699.99  http://sagetechcorp.com/

ADS-B Stratus

Categories: Apps, New Products
Comments: No

STRATUS ADS-B Stratus

I have a good flying friend that recently purchased the $799.00 Stratus portable ADS-B weather receiver for ForeFlight Mobile. Since he uses his iPad regularly, he naturally figured the Stratus would be an excellent addition and could soon pay for itself by discontinuing some other subscription services. On a first trial flight, IFR from Minneapolis area to Kansas City, the Stratus lost signal from the ground stations a number of times.(*Turns out that the particular unit appears to have a defect as a different unit had no issues on a similar flight.)
So, with a bit of research, there were a few possibilities. First is the Coverage Areas. Not all the U.S. is covered with the ADS-B system and the route appears to have some gaps in coverage.

Flying Cars

Categories: Aircraft
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Terrifugia

 

Found some fun Flying Car photos and history.

Check out the Gallery….

 

 

Why a flying car might be difficult to create:

Made for Driving Made for Flying
 auto  plane
Auto engines are designed
to have varying rpm for
constant speed changes in
traffic.
 Airplane engines run at a near
constant rpm at @1/2 an auto’s
maximum.
 Auto wheels are on the
outer perimeter & away from CG
to provide stability.
 Landing gear is near the CG for
easier rotation during takeoff &
landing.

Selling An Airplane

Categories: Aircraft
Comments: No

Recently I put up an airplane for sale and although I have sold three planes before, each time seems to be a different experience. So here is what went on and what one needs to think about.

How Much?
Currently aircraft are not selling all that well, so prices are depressed. The first thing I did was go to the AOPA website and do a VREF (Aircraft Value Reference) to see what the plane is estimated to be worth. You need to be an AOPA member to use the VREF, but being an AOPA member is definitely worthwhile for pilots with all the membership benefits. Well, a bit of a surprise on the value, but then everyone always thinks their stuff is worth more than the market. I also looked at the various for-sale sites to see what the asking prices were. I chose a price a bit higher so I had room to negotiate.

Website & BLOG

Categories: Site News
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WEBSITE
MyFlyingStuff is an organized(?) accumulation of the many resources and information that I have found on the web and use on a regular basis for my flying passion. If you have suggestions for topics, links or whatever that will help others, please let me know by emailing to:
BLOG
As you can see, I have now set up a Blog on the website and will try to provide interesting and useful topics. Please feel free to comment on any of the posts by clicking “comments” located at the top of each article!

 

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